Browse Research Abstracts

Connecting the dots: Identifying suspected serial sexual offenders through forensic DNA evidence Campbell, R., Feeney, H., Goodman-Williams, R., Sharma, & Pierce, S.J. (2020)

Psychology of Violence, 10(3). 255 – 267

Type of Profession: Academics (Educators/Researchers), Advocates, Clerks/Other Court Personnel, Health Care Professionals, Judges, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 3/Issue 3 - THE EXCHANGE - July 2020
Keywords: Sexual assault

Summary:

This study examined the forensic DNA testing results from a large sample of sexual assault kits to gain further understanding of patterns of sexual offending. Results found that over one-third of the perpetrators in the study had two or more sexual assaults linked via DNA which is higher than what has been previously documented in recidivism studies (recidivism is the relapsing of criminal behavior).

Do you believe your partner is capable of killing you? An examination of female IPV survivors’ perceptions of fatality risk indicators Johnson, L., Cusano, J.L., Nikolova, K., Steiner, J.J., & Postmus, J.L. (2020) Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 1 – 26.

Type of Profession: Academics (Educators/Researchers), Advocates, Clerks/Other Court Personnel, Health Care Professionals, Judges, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 3/Issue 3 - THE EXCHANGE - July 2020
Keywords: Intimate partner violence (IPV) (domestic violence), Other crime or violence

Summary:

This study examined the factors most associated with lethality risk for survivors of intimate partner violence (IPV). Different analyses were used to differentiate between women who believed their partners were capable of killing them and those who did not.

Risk factors for male perpetration and female victimization of intimate partner homicide: A Meta-Analysis Spencer, C.M., & Stith, S.M. (2020)

Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, 21(3), 527 – 560

Type of Profession: Academics (Educators/Researchers), Advocates, Clerks/Other Court Personnel, Health Care Professionals, Judges, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 3/Issue 3 - THE EXCHANGE - July 2020
Keywords: Intimate partner violence (IPV) (domestic violence), Other crime or violence

Summary:

This study reports that the strongest risk factors for intimate partner homicide (IPH) were the perpetrator having direct access to a gun, perpetrator’s previous nonfatal strangulation, perpetrator’s previous rape of the victim, perpetrator’s previous threat with a weapon, the perpetrator’s demonstration of controlling behaviors, and the perpetrator’s previous threats to harm the victim. Implications for law enforcement personnel, medical professionals, victim advocates, mental health professionals, and other professionals who may be in contact with potential IPH perpetrators and victims are discussed in this article.

Childhood exposure to partner violence as a moderator of current partner violence and negative parenting Hasselle, A.J., Howell, K.H., Thurston, I.B., Kamody, R.C., & Crossnine, C.B. (2020)

Violence Against Women, 26(8), 851-869

Type of Profession: Academics (Educators/Researchers), Advocates, Clerks/Other Court Personnel, Health Care Professionals, Judges, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 3/Issue 3 - THE EXCHANGE - July 2020
Keywords: Child Maltreatment, Intimate partner violence (IPV) (domestic violence), Child witness to IPV

Summary:

This study examined the interactive effect of mothers’ exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV) during childhood and the impact of IPV on negative parenting practices. Mothers were recruited from community sites serving individuals experiencing IPV. Findings indicated that the following childhood IPV exposure variables moderated the association between current IPV severity and negative parenting practices: total types of IPV witnessed, witnessing sexual IPV, and witnessing psychological IPV. Results highlight the intergenerational effect of violence and the importance of addressing trauma across the family system.

Sexual abuse and assault in a large national sample of children and adolescents. Gewirtz-Meydan, A., & Finkelhor, D. (2020) Child Maltreatment, 25(2), 203 -214

Type of Profession: Academics (Educators/Researchers), Advocates, Clerks/Other Court Personnel, Health Care Professionals, Judges, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 3/Issue 2 - THE EXCHANGE - April 2020
Keywords: Sexual assault

Summary:

The present study sought to examine features of sexual abuse cases among a U.S. nationally representative sample of 13,052 children and adolescents, ages 0–17 years. Results indicate most offenses are at the hands of other juveniles (76.7% for males and 70.1% for females), primarily acquaintances, and occurring more frequently for adolescents aged 14–17. Whereas girls are mostly abused by males (88.4%), boys are abused by both males (45.6%) and females (54.4%).

Rural child maltreatment: A scoping literature review. Maguire-Jack, K., Jespersen, B., Korbin, J.E., & Spilsbury, J.C. (2020) Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, 1 -10

Type of Profession: Academics (Educators/Researchers), Advocates, Clerks/Other Court Personnel, Health Care Professionals, Judges, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 3/Issue 2 - THE EXCHANGE - April 2020
Keywords: Other crime or violence

Summary:

The current study sought to review existing knowledge on rural child maltreatment. A scoping literature review was conducted to answer whether maltreatment is higher in rural areas compared to urban areas and whether there are unique correlates of maltreatment in rural areas. Of the studies reviewed, five reported higher rates of maltreatment in rural areas, four reported higher rates in urban areas. Overall, child maltreatment rates tended to be higher in urban areas among people of color and higher in rural areas among White people.

A systematic review of barriers to formal help seeking for adult survivors of intimate partner violence in the United States, 2005 -2019 Robinson, S.R., Ravi, K., & Voth Schrag, R.J. (2020) Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, 1 -17.

Type of Profession: Academics (Educators/Researchers), Advocates, Clerks/Other Court Personnel, Health Care Professionals, Judges, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 3/Issue 2 - THE EXCHANGE - April 2020
Keywords: Intimate partner violence (IPV) (domestic violence)

Summary:

For individuals experiencing intimate partner violence (IPV), formal services are critical resources but barriers often exist to survivors accessing these services. This review identified six key barriers: (1) lack of awareness, (2) access challenges, (3) consequences of disclosure, (4) lack of material resources, (5) personal barriers, and (6) system failures.

Intimate partner homicides in the United States, 2003 – 2013: A comparison of immigrants and nonimmigrant victims Sabri, B., Campbell, J.C., Messing, J.T. (2018) Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 1 -23

Type of Profession: Academics (Educators/Researchers), Advocates, Clerks/Other Court Personnel, Health Care Professionals, Judges, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 3/Issue 2 - THE EXCHANGE - April 2020
Keywords: Intimate partner violence (IPV) (domestic violence), Other crime or violence

Summary:

This study examined differences in characteristics of killings of native-born and foreign-born (immigrant) residents in the United States. Women were the victims in 77.4% of intimate partner homicides (IPHs), with a greater proportion of women victims of IPHs being foreign-born than U.S.-born. Foreign-born women killed by their partners were more likely than U.S.-born women to be young, married, and killed by a young partner who stabbed, strangled, or suffocated them.

An updated review of institutions of higher education’s responses to sexual assault: Results from a nationally representative sample Richards, T.N. (2020) Journal of Interpersonal Violence. 34(10), 1983 – 2012

Type of Profession: Academics (Educators/Researchers), Advocates, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 3/Issue 2 - THE EXCHANGE - April 2020
Keywords: Sexual assault

Summary:

It has been more than a decade since the national 1999 study (Karjane, Fisher, & Cullen, 2002) reviewed a nationally representative sample of Institutions of Higher Education (IHEs) and documented “sexual assault on college campuses” and “what colleges are doing about it.” The current research aimed to examine the current state of IHE’s response to campus sexual assault as well as any changes in IHE’s response over the previous decade. This study provides a comparison of the data reported in the original report with 2015 data from a statistically equivalent sample.

Prosecutorial response to nonfatal strangulation in domestic violence cases Reckdenwald, A., King, D.J., & Pritchard, A.J. (2020) Violence and Victims, 35(2), 160 – 175

Type of Profession: Academics (Educators/Researchers), Advocates, Clerks/Other Court Personnel, Health Care Professionals, Judges, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 3/Issue 2 - THE EXCHANGE - April 2020
Keywords: Intimate partner violence (IPV) (domestic violence), Other crime or violence

Summary:

Recent research has pointed to the need for systematic law enforcement training on domestic violence when nonfatal strangulation is involved to improve evidence-based prosecution of these potentially deadly assaults; however, virtually no research has examined the legal response to nonfatal strangulation since many states have made it a separate criminal felony. The current exploratory study examines filing, charging, and adjudication decisions of nonfatal strangulation cases over a 3-year period based on evidence documentation in law enforcement reports to explore how these cases are handled by the criminal justice system in Brevard County, Florida. Results support previous research showing the importance of training police officers and other personnel as insufficient evidence may be one possible factor limiting the prosecutors’ ability to successfully prosecute domestic violence strangulation offenders to the highest extent available under the law. Implications spread across multiple disciplines.

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