Browse Research Abstracts

College campus sexual assault and female students with disabilities. Campe, M.I. (2019). Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 1 – 26.

Type of Profession: Advocates, Clerks/Other Court Personnel, Health Care Professionals, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys
Volume: Volume 2/Issue 4 - THE EXCHANGE - October 2019
Keywords: Sexual assault

Summary:

The present study uses data from the female respondents of the American College Health Association’s Fall 2016 National College Health Assessment to explore the relationship between female college campus sexual assault victimization and disability status. For example, being blind or partially sighted increased the odds of any type of sexual assault; while having a learning disability increased the odds of a completed sexual assault. ADHD and psychiatric conditions were also associated with increased odds of assault, as were alcohol and substance abuse.

Incarcerated women’s experiences of staff-perpetrated rape: Racial disparities and justice gaps in institutional responses. Fedock, G., Cummings, C., Kubiak, S., Bybee, D., Campbell, R., & Darcy, K. (2019). Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 1 – 25.

Type of Profession: Advocates, Clerks/Other Court Personnel, Health Care Professionals, Judges, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 2/Issue 4 - THE EXCHANGE - October 2019
Keywords: Sexual assault

Summary:

Within correctional settings, incarcerated women have disproportionately high rates of experiencing staff-perpetrated sexual victimization. In this study, Black women represented over half of the incarcerated women who experienced staff-perpetrated rape, but there were significant differences by race between women with regard to prison staff’s responses to their reports.

Anatomy of the homicide rise. Rosenfeld, R., & Fox, J.A. (2019). Homicide Studies, 23(3), 202 – 224.

Type of Profession: Advocates, Clerks/Other Court Personnel, Health Care Professionals, Judges, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 2/Issue 4 - THE EXCHANGE - October 2019
Keywords: Intimate partner violence (IPV) (domestic violence), Other crime or violence

Summary:

After declining for over two decades, homicides in the United States rose sharply in 2015 and 2016. In this article, researchers dissect the homicide rise by characteristics of the victims, offenders, and incidents and devote special attention to the similarities and differences in homicide growth by race.

Removing firearms from those prohibited from possession by domestic violence restraining orders: A survey and analysis of state laws. Zeoli, A.M., Frattaroli, S., Roskam, K., & Herrera, A. (2019). Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, 20(1), 114 – 125.

Type of Profession: Advocates, Clerks/Other Court Personnel, Health Care Professionals, Judges, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 2/Issue 4 - THE EXCHANGE - October 2019
Keywords: Intimate partner violence (IPV) (domestic violence), Other crime or violence

Summary:

Research shows the dangers firearms pose when violent intimate partners have access to them. Under federal and many state laws, persons under domestic violence restraining orders (DVROs) are prohibited from possession of firearms. The authors of this article analyzed state laws pertaining to the relinquishment or removal of firearms from persons prohibited from possession by DVROs.

Housing interventions for intimate partner violence survivors: A systematic review. Klein, L.B., Chesworth, B.R., Howland-Myers, J.R., Rizo, C.F., & Macy, R.J. (2019). Trauma, Violence, & Abuse, 1 – 16.

Type of Profession: Advocates, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys
Volume: Volume 2/Issue 3 - THE EXCHANGE - July 2019
Keywords: Intimate partner violence (IPV) (domestic violence)

Summary:

Intimate partner violence (IPV) survivors are much more likely to experience housing insecurity or homelessness than  people who have not experienced IPV. Results from this study showed that there is an overall dearth of research concerning interventions that address IPV survivors’ housing insecurity and needs and how effective they can be for survivors.

Social reactions and women’s decisions to report sexual assault to law enforcement. DePrince, A.P., Wright, N., Gagnon, K.L., Srinivas, T., & Labus, J. (2019). Violence Against Women, 1 – 18.

Type of Profession: Advocates, Health Care Professionals, Judges, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 2/Issue 3 - THE EXCHANGE - July 2019
Keywords: Sexual assault

Summary:

The current study addressed the dearth of research on links between the social reactions women received from community-based providers and informal supports, and reporting to law enforcement.  Findings showed that law enforcement reporting was associated with having received more positive reactions (tangible aid) and less negative reactions (distraction, being treated differently) from informal supports and more tangible aid and less emotional support from community-based providers.

Place, injury patterns, and female-victim intimate partner homicide. Reckdenwald, A., Szalewski, A., & Yohros, A. (2019). Violence Against Women, 25(6), 654 – 676.

Type of Profession: Advocates, Judges, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 2/Issue 3 - THE EXCHANGE - July 2019
Keywords: Intimate partner violence (IPV) (domestic violence), Other crime or violence

Summary:

Research has demonstrated that place (community of victim’s home) matters in the study of intimate partner violence (IPV) and intimate partner homicide (IPH), with rural women experiencing more severe IPV and a higher risk of IPH. This study used the National Violent Death Reporting System and explored the impact of place on both IPV and IPH.

The impact of stalking-related fear and gender on personal safety outcomes. Logan, TK., & Walker, R. (2019). Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 1 – 23.

Type of Profession: Advocates, Judges, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 2/Issue 3 - THE EXCHANGE - July 2019
Keywords: Intimate partner violence (IPV) (domestic violence), Stalking

Summary:

Research has consistently found that women worry more about their personal safety and feel more vulnerable to most every crime when compared with men. However, few studies include stalking as part of the victimization history. This study used a sample of 2,719 men and women and examined the prevalence and impact of stalking and stalking-related fear on concern about personal safety, perceived vulnerability to an attack, perceptions that risk of victimization is higher due to personal characteristics, discomfort when thinking about safety, and posttraumatic stress symptoms.  

Child protective service referrals involving exposure to domestic violence: Prevalence, associated maltreatment types, and likelihood of formal case openings. Victor, B.G., Henry, C., Gilbert, T.T., Ryan, J.P., & Perron, B. E. (2019). Child Maltreatment, 1 – 11.

Type of Profession: Advocates, Health Care Professionals, Judges, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 2/Issue 3 - THE EXCHANGE - July 2019
Keywords: Intimate partner violence (IPV) (domestic violence), Child witness to IPV

Summary:

The exposure of children to intimate partner violence (IPV) is now widely understood as potentially harmful to children, leading many child protection agencies in the U.S. to define child exposure to IPV as constituting child maltreatment.  The current study investigated substantiated child abuse directly related to IPV to better understand these patterns and how child protection workers respond under the “harm or threatened harm” standard.

When a woman kills her man: Gender and victim precipitation in homicide. Suonpää, K., & Savolainen, J. (2019). Journal of Interpersonal Violence, 1 – 16.

Type of Profession: Advocates, Judges, Law Enforcement, Mental Health Professionals, Other Attorneys, Prosecutors
Volume: Volume 2/Issue 3 - THE EXCHANGE - July 2019
Keywords: Intimate partner violence (IPV) (domestic violence), Other crime or violence

Summary:

This research study examined homicide cases and application of the concept of victim-precipitation, particularly in instances in which a female kills her intimate partner. The results from data analysis demonstrated strong support for the assumption that killings by women of their male intimate partners are more likely to have been victim precipitated than other types of homicide.

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