Student Support

GRADUATE STUDENT SUPPORT

The next generation of advocates, justice professionals, health and mental health professionals, and academicians is found walking the paths of today's college campuses and sitting in the seats of today's university classrooms. The OPSVAW is committed to ensuring that interested students in a variety of disciplines receive financial support for educational and research opportunities related to violence against women.  Support is available for graduate students in the departments and programs formally affiliated with the OPSVAW; and for professional (law) students who work for the OPSVAW executive director.

Graduate student support comes in two forms:  First, graduate fellowships are available for outstanding graduate students whose research programs include some aspect of violence against women.  Additionally, graduate research assistantships (RA) are available for graduate and professional students who are employed to work on research projects led by Carol Jordan, Executive Director of the OPSVAW; or by select department or program faculty.  Funding support for RA positions may last one summer session, one semester, or one year.  To be eligible for a fellowship or research assistantship, students must be located in a department formally affiliated with the OPSVAW, including the Department of Psychology, the Department of Political Science, the Department of Gender & Women's Studies, and the African American and Africana Studies Program.  Calls for proposals are released in May of each spring semester.

Funds for fellowships and research assistantships come through the OPSVAW endowment and from the Mary Byron Scholars Program.

The Mary Byron Scholars Program was created to honor a young woman who lost her life at the hand of a violent ex-partner.  Mary was a 21-year old woman who lived in Louisville, Kentucky. In 1993, her abusive boyfriend was arrested for kidnapping and raping her. She asked local law enforcement and corrections officials to alert her when he would be released from jail as she knew how dangerous he was to her. At the time, however, no automatic alert system was available, so Mary did not receive an alert. On her 21st birthday while leaving work, her ex-boyfriend shot and killed her. Mary’s death led to creation of the statewide automated victim notification system (V.I.N.E.®), a first of its kind resource for crime victims.

The Mary Byron Scholars Program was created through a gift to the OPSVAW from the Mary Byron Foundation in Louisville, Kentucky.  The Program supports fellowships and research assistantships offered through the OPSVAW.

 

2016/2017 Research Assistantships Awarded

Alyssa Jones, Department of Psychology.  The Mary Byron Scholars Program is supporting Alyssa's work with Dr. Christal Badour on developing a comprehensive model of emotional experience and emotion regulation among female victims of interpersonal violence.

LaKeysha Singleton, College of Law: LaKeysha is employed within the OPSVAW as a Research Assistant to Executive Director Carol E. Jordan to assist with a research project related to the mandatory reporting of crime and abuse.

 

2016/2017 Graduate Fellowships Awarded

Steven Kaiser, Department of Political Science. The OPSVAW Graduate Fellowship supports Steven's work entitled Beyond Conventional Measures Endorsement of Intimate Partner Violence and Attitudes Toward Rape Victims.

 

 

2016 Supplemental Awards

Eteri Tsintsadze-Maass, Department of Political Science:  The OPSVAW Graduate Fellowship supports Etuni’s work on the association of democratic institutions and women’s rights, specifically including violence against women.

Sarah Beth Bell, Department of Psychology: The OPSVAW Research Assistantship supports Sarah Beth’s work on the use of the PR-A paradigm to study aggressive behavior.

 

2015/2016 Graduate Fellowships Awarded

Ellen Stone, Department of Psychology: The OPSVAW Graduate Fellowship supports Ellen's work on the role of sexualized stereotypes in sexual harassment, dating violence, and rape.

Dakota Thomas, Department of Political Science:  The OPSVAW Graduate Fellowship supports Dakota's international work on how women's suffrage affects trends in violence against women and broader trends of democratic instability.

Lisa Schroot, Department of English & the Department of Gender & Women's Studies: The OPSVAW Graduate Fellowships supports Lisa's work on rape culture in American literature and society.

 

2014/2015 Graduate Fellowships Awarded

Kathleen Clark, Department of Political Science:  The OPSVAW Graduate Fellowship supports Katie's work that examines how sexual violence during conflict (war) contributes to negative political outcomes on post-civil conflict society.

Kelly Lynch, Department of Psychology:  The Mary Byron Scholars stipend supports Kelly’s research program involving application of applied psychosocial theory to perceptions of rape and victim blaming.

Jenna Jewell, Department of Psychology:  The Mary Byron Scholars stipend supports Jenna’s research program on adolescents’ perceptions of gender-based teasing, bullying, and rejection within their middle school classrooms; and on the negative mental health outcomes that are a result of the victimization experienced by gender atypical adolescents.

 

2014/15 Graduate Research Assistantships Awarded

Molly Coffey, College of Law:  Molly was employed within the OPSVAW as a Research Assistant to Executive Director Carol E. Jordan during the summer and fall of 2014 to assist with projects on civil orders of protection and other legal topics.  

 

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